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AIS County Programs in Minnesota

Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Aid is available to counties via a tax bill passed by the MN legislature in 2014 that provides funds for aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention. This standing appropriation comes directly from the MN Department of Revenue to MN counties and is apportioned based on the number of boat ramps and watercraft parking spots in each county. Each year, $10 million will be provided to Minnesota counties to support AIS prevention programs.

County board representatives designate AIS program oversite to a local government within the county. The designated local government works closely with local, state and federal governments, as well as nonprofit and private organizations, to develop and implement AIS prevention programs. Individual counties make decisions on how funds are to be used. The Counties are free to fund other entities, like watershed districts or lake associations, businesses or even other counties if doing so helps reduce the spread of AIS. Funds must be spent according to state statute, while still abiding by all current laws and regulations.

Eighty-three out of 87 counties have received AIS prevention aid and 43 of those responded to a DNR survey in 2015 regarding local efforts related to the program. In addition, the DNR held 10 AIS regional workshops around the state and 67 of the 83 counties receiving AIS Prevention Aid sent representatives to participate.

MN COLA enthusiastically supports the County AIS Prevention Aid program. The programs below are some of those that used State funding to the counties for the sole prevention and spread of AIS. They are completed and part of the public record. County committees still working toward building an effective and efficient AIS program may find it useful to compare what has been done. Keep in mind that these plans must remain flexible and subject to further fine-tuning. They are provided for informational purposes and are not endorsed by MN COLA unless agreed to and so noted. MN COLA invites notification of any updates to these or other MN county AIS programs.

Note: the Stearns County Rapid Response Plan is open source, without copyright, and can be adapted for use in other counties. Also, the authors of the Hubbard County COLA's AIS Lake Monitoring Early Detection Program offer their plan as a template for use by other counties.

Click on a county name or county seat to go to MN Counties with a published AIS program.

AITKIN
Aitkin
ANOKA
Anoka
BELTRAMI
Bemidji
CASS
Walker
COOK
Grand Marais
CROW WING
Brainerd
DOUGLAS
Alexandria
HUBBARD
Park Rapids
ITASCA
Grand Rapids
Lake
Two Harbors
LAKE OF THE WOODS
Baudette
MCLEOD
Glencoe
SHERBURNE
Elk River
ST. LOUIS
Duluth
STEARNS
St. Cloud
WASECA
Waseca
map of MN counties
lake and shore

MN COLA serves to coordinate the efforts of all lake, river, and watershed associations in Minnesota, related to shoreline preservation and restoration, water quality, prevention of aquatic invasive species (AIS), and sustainable uses and development for bodies of water in all counties, which include: Aitkin, Anoka, Becker, Beltrami, Benton, Big Stone, Blue Earth, Brown, Carlton, Carver, Cass, Chippewa, Chisago, Clay, Clearwater, Cook, Cottonwood, Crow Wing, Dakota, Dodge, Douglas, Faribault, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Grant, Hennepin, Houston, Hubbard, Isanti, Itasca, Jackson, Kanabec, Kandiyohi, Kittson, Koochiching, Lac Qui Parle, Lake, Lake Of The Wood, Le Sueur, Lincoln, Lyon, Mahnomen, Marshall, Martin, McLeod, Meeker, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Mower, Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Norman, Olmsted, Otter Tail, Pennington, Pine, Pipestone, Polk, Pope, Ramsey, Red Lake, Redwood, Renville, Rice, Rock, Roseau, St. Louis, Scott, Sherburne, Sibley, Stearns, Steele, Stevens, Swift, Todd, Traverse, Wabasha, Wadena, Waseca, Washington, Watonwan, Wilkin, Winona, Wright, and Yellow Medicine.

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Minnesota Coalition of Lake Associations

minnesotacola@gmail.com

Web design, Curtiss Hunt; masthead photo, Kathyrn Jonsrud; footer photo, Amanda Weberg.